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UK politics, a poor choice so why vote?

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It is time this government went.  In fact, in the UK it is time the whole political system was overhauled to do away with the timewasters, the politically correct nonsense and the unfair and ineffectual policies.

If you look at many of the gripes on this site, you'll see many people in this country have a similar frame of mind.  Firstly, the harder you work the more you get shafted.  Secondly the less you do or are prepared to do for yourself, the more the government will reward you for your laziness.  Thirdly, the laws in place to govern this land are outdated and the legal system and politicians are unable to keep up with this mess of a society they helped to create.

How's this for an idea; a party that is based upon common sense, best practice (modelling against successful political systems) and rewards the right-doers in society; a party where greed and personal betterment is set aside in favour of gaining by helping others, working collaboratively and being more community rich.  However, in this case the proof would be in the pudding of decent policies fairly carried out rather than empty rhetoric poorly executed.

Thatcher's Britain has left a legacy of personal greed

It seems to me that Thatcher's Britain has left a legacy of personal greed, hostility towards others, and has stripped this country of what were once its proud assets (and many other negative things besides).  That was the start of the rot and it has just got worse year upon year.

Personally I choose not to vote as I have no faith in any party to govern this country morally or correctly and I view the political system as inherently flawed and corrupt.  I believe when voting that a vote of no confidence should be allowed to be registered.  Many of us dont vote simply because we do not wish to be responsible for the abomination that will form the new government.  I am proud of the fact that I never voted for Thatcher, Major, Blair or Brown.  I would only have myself to blame for this mess if I had!  I hear you say, 'would you prefer anarchy then?'  In actual fact I would prefer not to vote at all if I don't want to choose to be governed by any of the available options.

UK politics, downing street It is time for a change and no, that doesn't mean the Tory party should be our government instead of the labour party.  That is exactly what people will do though, not because they believe in Tory policies, they will simply get the Tories in because they don't want a Labour government any more.  Then the Tories will of course screw up again and people will want Labour back.  We are going round in circles with no other serious rival to those two parties at the present time.

Lets get real, this is not a democracy (where are the referendums and Mr Browns election this year?). Where are our rights to privacy, peace of mind or fairness? Ill tell you where absolutely NOWHERE until things change significantly.

By: Disgruntled UK native


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boblet

boblet

M.M.G. I used the word Christian to get a point across. I attended a healthy cooking lesson the other day in a local Baptist church. The cook/Teacher was a muslim woman. She recited a poem she had composed. I am normally passive where religion is concerned but within her poem she referred to al ah, albeit obtusely. That is what is happening. I blame myself for not standing up to her. The slackness in our attitude to religion is being taken up by sly zealots who push islam at every opportunity.
boblet
23rd Oct 14 16:48

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miserablemoaninggit

miserablemoaninggit

Great Christian Britain? Apparently, if current trends continue, Islam will be the most dominant religion in terms of numbers of adherents within the next generation.

Muslims number 2,786,635, 4.4% of the total population according to the 2011 census figures. For every 10 babies born in the UK, 1 of them is Muslim.

I see the pendulum swinging right back in terms of gender equality and gay rights - both of which I absolutely and fully support.

I must confess that I find the increasing Islamic population somewhat worrying. However, having said that most Muslims I've come across are very pleasant people, although I've never spoken to a Muslim woman covered from head to toe and would not want to. The only prejudice I've experienced from a Muslim was when finishing a conversation with a Muslim man in Manchester who claimed he represented liberal Islam, but stated that he had to 'draw the line' when it came to s ex outside of marriage and homosexuality. He insisted on shaking my hand with his left hand; I didn't know what this meant at the time, but I do now. The irony of it!
miserablemoaninggit
23rd Oct 14 11:44

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boblet

boblet

S(D) I believe in Government. I believe in Democracy. I reject firmly liars. I am of the opinion that being dishonest to win the hearts of honest people is wrong. It is a corruption that I will not be part of any more. You cannot be a bit dishonest and expect to be honoured by office in this Great Christian Britain. Some countries have baksheesh as their way. I do not want it to become ours. I hope Thatcher who was the mother of it all turns in her grave.
boblet
23rd Oct 14 01:17

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Samson (Delilah's too busy to post)

Samson (Delilah's too busy to post)

I firmly believe that if you do not vote then you have no right to complain about the government. You give up that right by not bothering to have a voice when it mattered.
Samson (Delilah's too busy to post)
22nd Oct 14 22:06

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collar

collar

I agree Boblet - the way the government speaks to the people, is as a kindergarten teacher speaks to her charges. they blame the Labour party for every wrong, use divide and rule tactics, all smoke and mirrors really. The worrying thing is, so many people are happy to go along with their rhetoric, and are to ignorant, or too apathetic to look a little further, and to form their own opinion - with the internet, there really is no excuse for this political inertia.
I am not saying the Labour party is without blame - far from it - however the current party should be focused upon putting things right, rather than petty point scoring.
Oh well, same time tomorrow then.
collar
22nd Oct 14 20:01

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miserablemoaninggit

miserablemoaninggit

For the most part, I agree with you boblet, although will summon the energy to go out and vote Ukip come next May . . . reluctantly within the context of the failure of the 2 main political partys namely Labour and the Cons/LibDem.

As for your challenge, I must confess that I cannot name any such person.
miserablemoaninggit
22nd Oct 14 18:53

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boblet

boblet

Dream on M.M.G. I will also.
I do not vote at all. I will never vote again for liars. I challenge anyone one who posts on the T.W.G. to give the name of a person in government or authority who has one iota of integrity.
boblet
21st Oct 14 20:07

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miserablemoaninggit

miserablemoaninggit

The UK is an island with finite resources. Over-crowded roads, trains, GP surgeries, hospitals and - as today's news emphasises - urgent prison problems due to over-population within them.

We need some hard facts about immigration but, even in doing so, one should accept that the arguments are not just economic ones. There are other issues that are less 'physical', so to speak, but no less important. For example, a sense of community; cultural identity; national identity; cohesiveness; stability; a sense that the government is in control (indeed, that there is a proper UK government, so to speak); a commonality of language; even humour.

I'm not arguing for some sort of monoculture and I accept that immigration is necessary. However, it should be very carefully managed and controlled for the benefit of both the indigenous population and the immigrants (not just Big Business with its insatiable demand for cheap labour) with a massive emphasis upon integration with the mainstream culture, but also allowing for some cross-exchange of ideas in a healthy way.

I am not Vince Cable, or Nick Clegg, or Ed Milliband etc living in a wealthy, privileged, somewhat cloistered life surround by middle to upper-middle class friends and acquaintances (including some such immigrants), but am basically a working-class bloke from a working-class family from the North of England whose community has been inundated by an unprecedented number of immigrants who largely live in segregated communities.

I was not asked; nobody ever consulted me; the Labour Party betrayed me; Westminster is remote to me; I feel disenfranchised; disaffected; and basically, somewhat fed-up with the broken nature of our democracy and the arrogance of the chattering class who have a monopoly it seems in much of the media. The working-class voice needs to be heard!
miserablemoaninggit
21st Oct 14 17:03

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Samson (Delilah's too busy to post)

Samson (Delilah's too busy to post)

I think London is very different to many parts of the country in this respect. Only 30% of the population of London is made up of indiginous people. Immigrants head to the supposed bright lights of the big city in much greater numbers than anywhere else. That is not to say other areas are not affected though, they are.
I cannot remember the last time I went into a shop/restaurant in London and was served by an indiginous English person. There are plenty that are English having been born here to immigrant parents but you can see that their ancestry is not English. I still maintain though that the immigration issues in the UK are not much different to other countries. Whilst we may have more of them I think we can cope with it better than other countries. If you think it is bad here then head to Cyprus for a while. There are more eastern Europeans there than Cypriots these days.
Samson (Delilah's too busy to post)
21st Oct 14 12:37

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Zanni

Zanni

MMG

" the working classes who have borne the brunt of the impact of immigration, both in London and outside of it (yes, there is a different perspective on this from that of London)"

I agree that working class people have had to bear the brunt of the mass immigration "experiment" started by New Labour but how do you think working class people in London have a different perspective on it to those in other parts of the country? Did you have a particular part of the country in mind when you said this?
Zanni
21st Oct 14 11:00

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Jethro

Jethro

MMG, If UKIP, and I say If, win the Rochester bye-election, I believe the flood gates will open with certain MP's defections. The result will clearly indicate the intention of the voting public concerning their total mis-trust of the political system in the UK.
Jethro
20th Oct 14 20:46

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miserablemoaninggit

miserablemoaninggit

The latest - Cameron is going to make an announcement sometime before Christmas. This is getting ridiculous! Clearly, he is scrambling around trying to find something that will persuade the voters in the forthcoming Rochester bye-election not to vote UKIP, and rather vote Conservative even though they have failed to control immigration for the last 5 years of coalition government.

Pathetic!
miserablemoaninggit
20th Oct 14 19:47

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miserablemoaninggit

miserablemoaninggit

It really is laughable! Not even talk now, but just rumours of more talk about steps to curb the massive levels of immigration. Have we ever had a Primeminister who 'ducks and dives' so much than Cameron?

What can he do about it? Answer: nothing! The UK's sovereign right to control its own borders has been passed to the EU and there is nothing we can do save from pulling out of the EU.

I for one and sick and tired of rumours and rumours of rumours, and talk of little substance. It is time that the British people, especially the working classes who have borne the brunt of the impact of immigration, both in London and outside of it (yes, there is a different perspective on this from that of London), see some action. 2017 is too late! Action now please!
miserablemoaninggit
20th Oct 14 15:13

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miserablemoaninggit

miserablemoaninggit

Nigel Farage made a great point when referring to the General Election next May. He said something like 'People aren't voting for a new government next May, they are just voting for a change of management'. This was said in the context of the EU now having so much power and the loss of UK sovereignty.

It seems to me that he is quite correct. The longer we stay in the EU, the more democracy is undermined and UK government becomes increasingly irrelevant.
miserablemoaninggit
13th Oct 14 18:33

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Jethro

Jethro

It's amazing what politicians promise running up to a general election.But whats even more amazing is the number of people that believe these claims and then complain later when they are not forfilled.
Jethro
30th Sep 14 07:28

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