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Charity parachute skydive, but who pays?

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In June last year I did a skydive to raise money for a charity.  I particularly wanted to raise money for Macmillan Cancer Relief but unfortunately they do not support extreme sports, their insurance doesn't cover that.  So I decided to do it off my own back.

I phoned up my local parachute centre at Weston on the Green to request information on the courses they do.  I decided I would do the solo skydive as it was more daring than a tandem.  I also decided that I was going to pay for it myself, as it was something I had always wanted to do anyway.  That way at least all of the money I raised would go to my chosen charity.

Don't fool people into thinking that their kind sponsorships are going to charity.

Skydiver in freefall As I was walking out of my local sports centre the other day, I noticed a poster about doing a charity skydive for Mencap.  I thought that I'd love to do it again but go one better and do an Advanced Free Fall course.  And even better, I could raise money for a charity whilst doing it, so I had a look at their website.

However, I was horrified to discover that you need to raise a minimum of £530 and which only around £140 will actually go to the charity because they take the cost of the course and booking fee out of the money raised.  I have to say that I didn't actually find this information on their website.  I just did a search under Google for charity skydive's to find out.

I think that this is terrible, as people have sponsored you thinking that their money is actually going to charity when most of it actually isn't but is going towards the individual have a few minutes of thrills.

If you really want to do a skydive and want to raise money for charity, pay for it yourself.  Don't fool people into thinking that their kind sponsorships are going to charity.


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collar

Well When I done one last year I paid for it out of my funds. Yes, the prices are terribly high, but no more so than for a charming holiday abroad. What I object to is the fact that you have to be able to get double for the charity, in effect and you raise aweness with you're work on the QT. I believe that the actual flight of the aeroplane is not very good nowadays - but unfortunately as my legs are deteriorating and my body was dropping, it looked like I will have to buy a prosthetic limb... asssuming I can get one of course.
9th Mar 14 04:03

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Busy

I understand everyone's views on here. I want to do a charity tandem skydive to raise money for charity. I will add as much as I can to pay for the jump but my funds are limited. The main reason I want to do a jump is because of the other thing I don't have a lot of- time. I can't spend a couple of hours each day training for an endurance event or organising a charity event as I have 3 small children. I will be able to get family to look after my kids for a few hours on one day. I will spend a lot of time gathering sponsorship with my kids in tow and help to raise much more than the 'minimum'.
9th Mar 14 01:03

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Yazz

I was thinking about a charity skydive for autism. glad I read this. now I know I have to do a lot more research...
thanks for the info.
but you know what. it kinda makes me sick that "charities" take more of the money donated for themselves and all of these hidden fees, rather than giving it to the people they're supposed to. where's BBCs panorama when you need them?
27th Jun 11 02:06

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Appo

If you inform people that a proportion of their hard earned cash is funding your jump and they are happy with it,fine.The problem is when people are not informed and are misled into thinking that all of their money is going to the cause.I think morally you should pay for your skydive,like everything else in life,if u can't afford it,don't do it!!!do a 5k instead!
24th Mar 11 03:03

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Sah123

I totally agree. I will be doing a sky dive for Lung cancer and will be paying for the sky dive myself so any money raised will go straight to the charity!!!
25th Feb 11 09:02

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old but still grumpy

When I hear about a charity parachute jump I always think the annoying person who pesters you to sponsor them should be pushed out of the plane without the parachute.
22nd Oct 10 10:10

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Sarah

If you look through JustGiving there are many sponsored jumps but not many mention that the fee is deducted from the sponsorship money you are asked for.

Maybe it should be compulsory to show what deductions are being made?
22nd Oct 10 05:10

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Timelord

I think the idea is that YOU pay for the jump, the sponsors donate money for you to do it. Otherwise, the sponsors are, in effect, subsidising your hobby? One of my mates is a qualified parachute instructor, in fact he is often the "one who knows what he is doing" on tandem drops and the normally charity jumper pays the costs, then raises the cash for the good cause from sponsors

I quite like visiting the opera, so should I ask sponsors to stump up enough cash for me to go regularly?
10th Oct 10 02:10

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Kathleen

As a widow on a very low income I have no funds available to donate... so I work in a charuty shop and derive great pleasure from it,( should it be unpleasant to make charitable) I'd like to do more.... a sky dive???? Hmmm hate heights, risks, etc....but if I can raise just a little bit of money for a good cause and benefit in my sense of worth does that make the cash for charity of any kess value.? Sad to say charity has to be commercial ... and sponsoring me to learn to crochet won't earn any revenue for a charity.
PS.
MY children will cover the cost for my sky dive ( haven't told them the will is in a charities favour)
15th Jul 10 02:07

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Mav

Overall charities make a lot of money from skydiving, however just look at the cost of doing a parachute course direct, lots people fundrise well in excess of the minimum.

All this site is rising plenty through ad clicks.
12th Apr 10 07:04

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Frugal

Wow, this has got some bad comments. I think you've a right to whinge about the very poor charity deal your local dropzone has put together though, surely its not still running that scheme?

When I did my Charity Skydive I had to raise the amount to pay for the jump through sponsorship, and I openly told people that a portion of their money would go towards paying for the jump, with any excess sponsorship going towards the charity. This was made clear to me by my local dropzone, Skydive North West (Cark). On top of this I also had to raise an amount equal to the cost of the jump both from any excess sponsorship and any other charitable donations I received, part of which involved me performing a street collection in manchester city centre.

But despite some of the other comments, lets face it that there are many cheaper things you could do to raise money for charity. If you are serious about charity, I think skydiving is a bit of a bum deal. To be honest I did my first jump for charity as a student just to get out of paying for it myself.. Does a sponsored skydive attract more sponsorship than free or cheaper sponsored events? I don't know about that, maybe it depends on the personn. I'm considering doing the 3 peak challenge this year, I think people would give me far more cash for that as it involves a lot of effort, and a much higher percentage of the funds will go to charity.

Skydiving certainly attracts people into charitable sponsorships who otherwise wouldn't bother, so perhaps thats where its power lies as a positive thing for charities in general.
21st Jan 10 10:01

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a

How would you know whether people have told their sponsors that this is how the payment works or not? Some people may want to raise a significant amount of money such as £140 for charity but may not have the money to pay the rest of the jump so as long as they do not lie to their sponsors I dont think you have any right to judge people who want to help but may not have the funds that you do.
15th Nov 09 10:11

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Daniel

Ok, so I understand your point of view about not ALL the money is going towards the charity. But lets think about it... Yes people want to donate, but people also want to enjoy themselves. My view is that i'd rather see more people raising money for a charity by doing somthing they will enjoy, than people not enjoying doing somthing and therefore not doing it at all.
You mention in the article above that ONLY £140 goes to the charity... I think your missing the point... £140 is going to your chosen charity!!! Thats £140 more going than if you didnt do anything.
Some people (especially in todays ecomonic climate) cant just afford to do pay for a sky dive. So why not kill 2 birds with 1 stone and raise money.

Get a grip and stop moaning about people raising money for Charity. I wander if Help 4 Heroes will get annoyed with me for raising £140 for them when I do my skydive? I would guess not.
29th Sep 09 04:09

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Timelord

I have heard a representitive of a hospital suggest that over a year the costs to the NHS of "charity" sky dives, mainly minor injuries, far exceeds any money raised. This is why some charities discourage such activities.

I wonder how much of the cost is insurance, as your normal "life cover" almost certainly does not cover such activities.
25th Aug 09 02:08

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usedtobegrumpy

I'd rather sponsor someone who wants to do a skydive etc not to do it, so they would be sacrificing something instead of getting others to pay for them to enjoy themselves. Have you ever wondered why people don't ask for sponsorship for them to do something useful (like doing some work for the charity they support)? Could it be because they wouldn't get any enjoyment out of that? I prefer to donate direct to any charity and get annoyed by all the requests for these 'charity sponsorship' donations.
6th Jul 09 08:07

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.A.

yeah some of you have a point but if the charities are being ripped off why would they still be askin for people to sponser them?? and the money that is raised is going towards hospitals ect to help save peoples lives and do something about their conditions so the money that is raised is actually doing something good for people and some of it is goin towards you doing something you have always wanted to do and the rest of the money is going to a hospial or research to save someone..
6th Apr 09 10:04

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B. Honest

Ok so you're getting people to donate which is better than them not etc etc.......
But... many people get approached for sponsorship on a number of occasions through-out the year. They sponsor you to sky dive, say a tenner, and they think "I've given a tenner to charity". In reality, they only give a percantage of that tenner to charity - if a sponsee were unscrupulous/lazy they woule get the absolute minimum in sponsorship and hence (from research) they'd only be donating three eigths of a tenner to charity, the rest goes to the dive school (most of which are charging £250 for a tandem jump which is well over the odds!).
Now, the next sponsee comes along, this time 100% of proceeds going to charity, and the person will likely sponsor less that they would have done had they not just sponsored the sky-diver wannabee. Ergo - charity has just lost out!!!
This whole "do it for free" idea is nothing more than a complete scam - designed to lure in people, the majority of whom are actually trying to do good. If you want to do it that way, be honest, ask people to chip in to pay for you to have a great time and raise a bit for charity at the same time.
I got approached by someone to sponsor such an event and refused. I said that I would be more than happy to donate a sum of money directly to the charity under their name instead.....

Wanna do it properly - pay fo the jump yourself!
19th Mar 09 09:03

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Kevski

I totally agree with you here. Iv looked into it in the past and am doing the same again, trying to pluck up the courage! Its very off putting to see that the majority of the money people have sponsered you goes towards the jump itself. Id feel no less than a fraud to take money off people in order to pay for my jump under the guise of 'charity'.
If I go ahead I'll definitely pay for it myself and raise the charity money seperately
Cheers
27th Jan 09 02:01

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Scooby

ThaDeViL - It's not a review you idiot, it's a gripe, a complaint, a rant, someone letting off some steam. Where on earth did it say it was a review? Perhaps you should consider a parachute jump without a canopy yourself, that way there will be one less muppet in the world.
27th Sep 08 01:09

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ThaDeViL

What a pointless waste of time this "review" is. Next time you jump try it without a parachute.

Regards.
27th Sep 08 11:09

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sausagesmcginty

I can see the posters point on feeling you are cheating your sponsors out of money but I also think it is fine as long as you inform all your sponsors of the situation beforehand and perhaps chip in for the cost, not the whole amount but a good amount. I feel it is a good way to raise money for your chosen charity as you are at least doing something whereas if you didnt do the jump they wouldnt receive a thing. Perhaps the skydiving websites could be a bit clearer when they say "raise £400 and jump for FREE!" it took me a lot of rooting around a few different sites before I realised how it worked. I would offer this advice. Give yourself plenty of time from deciding to jump and downloading sponsorship forms to the actual date of your jump so as to maximise the time you have to raise as much as you can and also as above - pay as much as you can afford towards it.
7th Sep 08 08:09

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Big Brother

You are a miserable loner...how much money have you given to charity from your own pocket?
Do not piss on other peoples efforts to make yourself look like a saint! Clean your own house before you pick flaws in other peoples.
7th Jul 08 09:07

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mharri2

As a centre that organises Tandem jumps for many national charities - heres the simple answer. The mimimum raised is £395 of which a mimimum £160.00 goes to the organisation - having organised 1385 people to do these jumps last year (2007) that means that charitable organisations recieved £221,600.00! as an absolute minimum - would that money have gone to the organisations directly - I think not!, in addition many people raise more than the minimum ands some decide to pay for the actual jump themselves, in addition anyone aged 40 or over requires a signed and stamped medical that a GP has to provide - generally at a cost of £75.00 plus to the individual that they cannot recoup from the sponsorship funds - LET PEOPLE FUND RAISE IN THE MANNER THEY WISH, people fund raise in all manner of ways, applaud their efforts rather than slamming someone doing something
25th Mar 08 03:03

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Vicki

I did a skydive for charity last year, and was required to get minimum sponsorship of £340 and could jump for 'free'. Of course it wasn't free, the money for the jump came out of the sponsorship money, leaving about £120 for the actual charity. I've never done anything like this before, and have suffered depression and panic attacks for years, so to do something as amazing (and scary!) as this, was a huge thing. All my friends and family realised this, and I raised the minimum sponsorship relatively easily, but didn't give up then, I carried on collecting from local businesses etc. I finally raised about £500, so the charity got a lot more, and I got more satisfaction from doing it, knowing the amount I'd raised. I think if you can pay for it yourself and give more to charity, go for it, but for those of us who cant afford to pay for such an amazing experience, put in a bit more effort with sponsorship collection and go above and beyond (literally!)
27th Jan 08 08:01

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Becky

I'm 15 and on my 16th birthday I'm taking part in a tandem skydive for charity! How on earth am I meant to afford to pay for it myself. It was said previously that 'surely EVERYONE has hundreds of pounds to spare' well the truth is not everyone does. I want to help a charity, Oxfam, and I have realised that by collecting in school this would be the most effective way of raising a lot of money. Even if some of it is used to pay for my jump at least I am doing something to help others!
13th Jan 08 09:01

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Charity mate

I was seriously thinking of doing a charity jump and money raised would go to Christie's. The hospital has treated family and friends, young and old.

After reading comments, some people have made me think twice and I now feel like I would be "ripping off" a charity as I wouldn't be able to pay for the jump myself, but as some have said at least I would be doing something.

I'm not an adrenalin junkie, I'm a single mum, over 40 and would probably have to pay for my GP to certify I'm fit to jump, also, there is a risk of death or injury to myself in all this. (Scared or what!)

I have raised money for charity in the past (men's charity wax) and pursuaded companies to give their support and services for free but the cost of getting a plane into the air and have an instructor surely can't be expected to be done for free.

So for all you people that can afford to pay for it, good for you, you should give more too. For those like myself who can't, I will continue to do my bit and jump if I can get the support!
3rd Jan 08 11:01

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SX

I just read all of the comments posted, I am interested in doing a skydive for charity but would not be able to fund it all! I appreciate the problems that people suggested but I do agree with the fact that least money is being raised that maybe would not have been given otherwise. Also for a lot of people it is challenge for them and that is why people are willing to support them (not someone who is a daredevil) therefore that is how the money is raised to such a high amount! It is commendable for people to pay their way but if you can't, other efforts into raising money should surely be appreciated! But thats just my opinion!
3rd Jan 08 02:01

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TheDr

Okay, so you are now sat there in front of your computer and moaning, if it annoys you so much why don't you send the hundreds of pounds difference to the charity yourself...what do you mean you can't afford to, surely EVERYONE has hundreds of pounds to spare to send to charities, no ? Okay so why don't you go out, collect sponsers (not easy) book a course, get down there, spend a day training, and then have your 30 second parachute jump, go home, collect the sponsership money (even harder), post it off to your charity, THEN your charity gets a couple of hundred pounds. Your way : Moan that everyone should pay their own expenses (which many can't afford), maybe 10 people do it and the charity gets the whole lot, 10 x £350 (minimum you need to raise to cover costs and donation) = £3500. The other way: 100 people do it, raising "only" £120 (minimum again) in donation, 100 x £120 = £12,000, over THREE times the amount, or of course you could just sit at your computer, moan about it and do nothing.....doesn't matter how many people do that..1000 x £0 is still NOTHING.
18th Oct 07 04:10

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Spenny

Its down to the individual and sponsor at the end of the day - some sponsors will pay to see that individual do whatever theyre doing.
Take the great british sponsored hair cut - the balding guy in the pub that refuses to stop growing his pony tail even though its the only patch of hair still growing on his head - is more likely going to get people to sponsor him rather than say if the local David Beckham did a sponsored hair cut- unless of course it is totaly ridiculus and he has to wear it in public for weeks on end...

As I say its down to the individuals - I would pay good money to see my nan do a parchute jump - whereas my 20 year old daredevil cousin who does this sort of stuff all the time wouldnt get as large a sponsorship..

and what you knockers and doubters are all forgetting is that to drum up this sponsorship takes some hard work - and that is deserved in the reward of the jump.
2nd Sep 07 04:09

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madgaz00

If you are going to do anything for charity which incurrs cost, then you or the company must pay for it and not the charity. Simple
29th Aug 07 06:08

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For Charity

I think that a charity skydive should raise funds that go straight to the charity. The person doing the jump should pay for the parachute jump themselves and if they are doing it as a cheap way to get into extreme sports or skydiving then it is just cheating people out of money. Do the skydive people, but give all the money to the charity
9th Jan 07 03:01

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MHARRI2

I can assure all persons here below that ALL legitamate charities and drop zones in the UK make it perfectly clear how the costs are broken down on all their paperwork - please rather than giving people a hard time for actually doing something (would you complain if you knocked on their door and they gave you 50p rather than £50)and applaud their efforts on behalf of their chosen organisation - as an aside this year AFTER jumping and admin costs the total raised was £221,328.00 so knock that number if you believe that sort of contribution nationally is not valid!
22nd Nov 06 04:11

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trob

I am sure that most charities are grateful for any contribution from anyone. Some people want to do something for charity but can not finace it all themselves. They should be applauded at going out and doin something and not sat griping.
17th Oct 06 04:10

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George

Of course not all the money people give goes directly to the source...some of it goes to keeping those charities running. It is the same principle - if someone can't afford to do a jump surely it is better for them to raise some money rather than nothing!? would you argue that charities should close down becasue money is used to pay staff? I don't think you should knock people who are doing something for charity - perhaps a little more support would go a lot further!
26th Sep 06 04:09

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Tom

I totally agree.

I did a jump for charity last week and all the money raised from sponsors went to the charity. I wanted to do the jump for myself so why should someone else pay for it.

If people are using sponsors money to finance the jump I hope they are making that clear when they are collecting.
18th Sep 06 11:09

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Sky God Bob

I agree that ALL the money raised should go to the charity and you should pay for the jump yourself. It's only fair, otherwise you're having fun at the expense of other people in the name of raising SOME money for charity.
22nd Aug 06 05:08

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mharri2

Hi All,

As a DZ operator who is directly involved with 6 Charities organising all of thier jumping activities nationally, a small piece of information for you, from our DZ alone last year (2005) over £128,000.00 was raised AFTER the jumping fees - some people choose to pay thier own way some choose to use the format provided - either way funds that would have been used elsewhere go to the charities, surely that is the objective to raise funds, we ensure that all persons booking are aware of the format and all the charities forms state that part of the funds may be used to pay for the jump, rather than knocking someone for doing something to raise funds why not assist them, commendation for paying your own way but that is your decision and often is not an option available to others
21st Apr 06 04:04

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Nats

Surely its best to do a jump and raise at least some money towards a charity, whether you have to use the some of of the funds or not is irrelevant. That person jumping is raising at least a couple of hundred pounds, rather than doing nothing and sending a tenner.
27th Mar 06 01:03

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Norma

Oh how I agree. I run marathons and am disgusted at all the charities that 'pay' you to run for them. Be it with clothes, training, watches etc. etc. If I give money to a charity I expect it to GO to the charity, not to pay people to do something they wanted to do in the first place. As the charities do it so much, it must bring in plenty of funds!

Incidently, my sister-in-law did a charity jump. I'm not sure how much she raised (though not an enormous amount) She raised considerably more selling the story to magazines and the telly - the main parachute failed to open - and kept all that money!!!
6th Mar 06 10:03

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blahblah

I agree, some people want to give to chairty but cant afford the initial out lay for something like a jump, at least they are doing something and they arent makin money for them elses anyway so whats the harm
12th Feb 06 12:02

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sponsor the parachute

Skydive for charity? Are you mad? Why would anyone want to jump out of a perfectly good flying machine, let alone for a charity?? Skydiving has got to be the most nutty thing I have ever heard off and as for who pays - who cares!
3rd Feb 06 12:02

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Joe

there may well be a little truth in what you say, but surely its better to do a sponsored jump and give £140 or indeed any amount of money to a charity. Its not about people making themselves feel good about giving money but raising as much as possible?
26th Jan 06 05:01

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EvilJoker

Nice point to raise! I would not have thought about that all the money doesn't go to charity. Thanks! I'll keep my eyes out from now on.
12th Jan 06 09:01

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