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Management jargon - what it really means

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Why is it that middle management talk in a different language?  I am currently on an all day (yes, all day) conference call with my sales manager and he's come up with an amazing amount of management jargon.

Anyway, in the last three hours he has come out with the following rediculous phrases:

  • We're on a 3 way street here
  • We really need to push the envelope on this one
  • It's a finely balanced situation, weighted heavily toward the customer
  • Think big
  • We need to touch base offline
  • What can you bring to the table?
  • Keep me in the loop
  • We need to get on the same page
  • Lets take a blue-sky approach
  • 360-degree feedback
  • Lets park that offline for a moment
  • By close of play
  • Think outside the box
  • Low hanging fruit

Why can't they just speak in English?  Does it mean they're cleverer than me because they use stupid management phrases that no other person understands?  Do they get paid more for saying "I need that by close of play today" instead of "e-mail it to me by 5pm please"?

And who said that "being assertive" means you get free reign to be as rude as you like to your staff?  My four year old has better manners. And they wonder why they have to "escalate" everything in order to get something done?  Stop "raising the red flag up the flagpole to see which way the wind blows it", and say "please" and "thank-you" a few times.

So, in closing, I've crafted some replies to the above list for your enjoyment..

We're on a 3 way street here. Interesting result from your driving test theory was it?
We really need to push the envelope on this one. Hell, I love envelope pushing. Beats working anyday. I like the padded ones with built in bubble wrap....
It's a finely balanced situation, weighted heavily toward the customer. Probably.
Think big Why? You're gonna send me ten million e-mails on the subject, meaning that even if I wanted to "Think Big", I have to spend so much time "thinking small" that I haven't enough time to "think big".
We need to touch base offline. You're not touching my base OFFLINE or ONLINE!
What can you bring to the table? My sandwiches and a flask of tea?
Keep me in the loop. Only if it's a tight one that prevents you from moving.
We need to get on the same page. We're not even on the same planet.
Lets take a blue sky approach. Don't you know what the English weather is like in November?
360 degree feedback. Typical of this company.... forever going round in circles.
Lets park that offline for a moment. Hope you never get a job with British Rail.
By close of play. So, we're just playing at this are we?
Think outside the box. You're totally out of your box already.
Low hanging fruit. You're the fruit.

Two words: "GCSE English". Go learn.

By:Robbie


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grumpyoldwoman

The definition of "colleague" below isn't very clear; this one is better.

"colleague n 1: an associate you work with [syn: {co-worker}, {fellow worker}, {workfellow}]
2: a person who is member of your class or profession; "the surgeon consulted his colleagues"."
7th Nov 12 03:11

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grumpyoldwoman

anon, I have quite a nice life, thank you very much.

That life gives me the odd five minutes to comment on this site; the purpose of which is to comment on things which annoy us, after all.

What good is language if the meaning of words is changed at random? The definition of "colleague" is "one of a group of people who work together" but it seems to be replacing the word "employee". What good is that?

In the words of management speak "we all need to be singing from the same hymn sheet" or we can't communicate properly with each other.
7th Nov 12 02:11

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grumpyoldwoman

Following my comment on 11/05/11; another misuse of the word "colleague".

A man from Dixon's was on the radio explaining that his company was prepared to take on staff from Comet in the run up to Christmas. He said that a great many "colleagues" had already applied.

How can they be his colleagues when he works for Dixon's and they work for Comet? They may be his colleagues in the future; or is he moonlighting and working for both companies?
7th Nov 12 11:11

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Rita Sue and Bob too

Petra their is nothing wrong with these people they are just commonly known as total c@nts, these people can usually be found either sitting outside Starbucks, in the 1st class section of a train using their laptops or on a Motorway service station paying a tenner for a a vile breakfast.
3rd Jul 11 11:07

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Petra

Hi Kenny,

thank you for making it look normal again.

Good luck with the changes to the site.

3rd Jul 11 09:07

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Kenny (Site Admin)

Hi Petra,

Well spotted, you found the deliberate bug. Hopefully it's gone now and you can post without any issues. If not, please get in touch.
3rd Jul 11 09:07

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Petra

Why have the inverted commas and other punctuation marks become gobbleydegook? Is there a new way I should be typing them?
3rd Jul 11 07:07

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Petra

We could not help overhearing two very loud business men in a coffee shop yesterday.

They kept using phrases that equated business ideas with childhood. One was saying things like "we need to bat that ball around the playpen a bit more" and the other, referring to resolving one problem and then being faced with another, said "Well, we got one orphaned child adopted and now we have another to find a home for"

We weren't sure at first if they were actually social workers, but after a while it became clear it was the just the latest management speak.

Is there something wrong with these people?
3rd Jul 11 07:07

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grumpyoldwoman

For want of a better place to put this; something which is annoying me at the moment is that many shops have started referring to the staff as "colleagues". Well, yes, to other members of staff they are, but not to me, the customer!

I saw a notice in a supermarket (can't remember which) a couple of months ago which said something along the lines of "if you need more information on this offer ask a colleague". I thought about asking one of the staff how a colleague of mine (in the construction industry) would know anything about their offer, but suspected that they wouldn't have a clue what I was on about.

Yesterday I went into my local Peacocks and saw that members of staff have started wearing badges with "colleague" on them. Gggrrrrrr!
11th May 11 04:05

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corp fool

I was going to leave a corporate comment but decided to 'run it up the flagpole and see who salutes it' before doing so
16th Dec 10 03:12

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Trick

Just came across this one....
"Therefore we have a high priority fast burn activity to produce a design and impact assessment"
what a load of management Hyperbally!!
1st Nov 10 07:11

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A wild sheep

I suspect that these phrases are used in a half baked attempt to hide their complete incompetence and the fact that their only purpose is to create mindless and time wasting work for people to justify their own position!!
When I read your response to "what can you bring to the table?" I pretty much showered my laptop in coffee in fits of laughter!!
6th Oct 10 12:10

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anon

Brett Challenger's comment about "Low hanging fruit" is first class. I can't stop giggling!
15th Sep 10 04:09

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anon

It's the only way management types with no actual brain can make themselves sound more important, by spouting phrases they hear on American TV. People who use this type of jargon generally have no thought processes of their own and should be exposed as the fraudsters they are. My favourite one is "C'mon guys, it's make or break time" To which, your answer should be "Break time, let's go for a cuppa!"
15th Sep 10 04:09

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Jo Wade

Hi there,

I think your website is very funny. I work for the BBC and I'm working on a new series for BBC Two with Kirsty Young and it's all about the British at work. The fourth episode is looking at the years from 1995 to the current day and we're looking to talk to people who have got stories to tell about these years and the following issues: the onset of management jargon; new technology that can monitor worker productivity or keep them on call to emails and phonecalls; the work / life balance and long hours culture; social networking sites at work and the boss being a 'friend'; inequality of pay in your workplace; the impact of the increase in contract based work; the increase in organisational restructuring and decrease in job security.

If you would like to get in touch with any stories you may have, please contact me at jo.wade@bbc.co.uk

Many thanks,

Jo
27th Jul 10 03:07

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Kit

grumpy xx

I like the blurb which states that something was made with, for example, "specially selected" fruit. That would be in contrast then to the usual practice of throwing in whatever was lying around on the floor ?
15th Jul 10 08:07

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Grumpy xx

Same goes for marketing messages that make no grammatical sense at all.

For example:

Buy this and that or the other and claim your 'free gift' (aren't all gifts free of charge? Otherwise they wouldn't be gifts would they!).
15th Jul 10 07:07

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Rider of the Apocalypse

What the f*ing eck are you lot jabbering on about?
12th May 10 01:05

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Umar Msc.Acc&Finance , man

out of the box .... one must think reflective in his actual job(s), that is the way which will support a manager always to look around the dynamics of the environment
12th May 10 01:05

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MikeP

"Close of play is a much simpler way to say .......before the end of your working shift or before cut off whichever is sooner!!.

360 degree feedback is .............. I would like feedback from your subordinates, colleagues, internal and external customers and superiors.

Offline is used during conference calls or webex conferences as .......... I will talk to you about this more after the conference call/webex has finished. "

Why are these phrases 'simpler' when they require explanation? They are idiotic, pompous, confusing, timewasting, self-important verbiage. I have banned this type of idiotspeak in the companies I work for. I return memos and emails which contain such drivel and when people use these terms in meetings I stop them and ask them what they mean.

Now that's thinking outside the box .........!
4th May 10 07:05

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NiceBoss

Hello. A couple of things from a management point of view. Close of play is used mainly when a company has flexible working hours or like mine is open 24/7. Therefore not everyone I am talking to finishes at 5pm. Close of play is a much simpler way to say to 20 different people before the end of your working shift or before cut off whichever is sooner!!.
360 degree feedback is a simpler way of saying I would like feedback from your subordinates, colleagues, internal and external customers and superiors. Offline is used during conference calls or webex conferences as a simpler way of saying I will talk to you about this more after the conference call/webex has finished. While I agree most jargon goes from the sublime to the ridiculous some managers find some of it helpful with the communication process.

I did laugh and laugh though at some of the replies so much so I may well use a couple at the next meeting :)
4th May 10 07:05

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brett challenger

Low hanging fruit - why does this make me think of haemorrhoids?
17th Apr 10 05:04

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brett challenger

Low hanging fruit - why does this make me think of haemorrhoids?
17th Apr 10 04:04

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grumpyoldwoman

Just, I can see your point but it depends on how you interpret the word "collided". To me it does not imply culpability, but the longer version is more passive, as you say.

However, a car which has crossed the central reservation is definitely in a place it should not be, so any collision is not likely to be the fault of the other driver in the first instance!
15th Apr 10 04:04

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Just

Grumpy, it's because the passive voice of "was in a collision" places less culpability either driver. That's for the courts to decide.
15th Apr 10 03:04

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grumpyoldwoman

I heard an example of "police speak" on tv the other day. A police officer was talking about a road accident and he said that a car had crossed the central reservation "and it co... er... was involved in a collision with another car".

He was obviously just about to say it "collided with another car" and changed it to add the extra words! WHY?
15th Apr 10 02:04

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1

Very P'd off....

Don't forget the overuse of the word 'engage.' Today, everyone 'engages' with others, they dont' discuss, agree or negotiate. I should know, I specialise in 'stakeholder engagement', which in simple terms means 'twisting key personnel's arms to ensure that things go my way with least resistance' (otherwise laughingly known as getting stakeholder 'buy-in').

A stakeholder, by the way, is someone who has a vested interest in the outcome of whatever they're engaging in. It has nothing to do with buying slabs of beef (for those of you who can't spell).
20th Dec 09 12:12

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freddie

loved it, I'll use some of those today, the answers I mean.
17th Nov 09 08:11

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Bukowski

Robbie, you're so right. There have been others over the years which thankfully don't seem to be used anymore: "Let's interface" (talk?), "I have a window next thursday" (yea, see you in the pub after work), "We need to run the extra mile" (er, do more work for nothing). The ones I hate the most though are "Blue sky idea" (does this mean a good idea?), "Fly it up the flagpole" (shall we give it a go?) and "Brainstorming" (is this going mad?). The worst example which I've fortunately only heard once was being told that "Business is a multi-limbed beast" (an octopus then?). Then again, I guess it's all my fault as I need to look at "The bigger picture" (Aaargh!)
30th Oct 09 12:10

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Andy

The ability to use these obscure phrases tends to mask stupidity rather than show intellect, so the answer is 'no,these people are not smarter than you'. I love it when the lack of understanding comes through with gems like "We'll need to turn this situation round 360 degrees" at which point I cannot resist pointing out the flaw in that statement.

It takes real intellect to communicate effectively. In the meantime we shall all synergise
whilst picking the low-hanging fruit and singing from the same hymnsheet (cont'd p94).
29th Oct 09 11:10

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Timur

I am a network engineer in Los Angeles - I was in a meeting yesterday...i heard the term "punch list" & I broke out in laughter & inquired, what is that? to which the reply swiftly came, "its a to-do list", to which I retorted, "so why not just say that?"
7th Oct 09 08:10

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Timur

I am a network engineer in Los Angeles - I was in a meeting yesterday...i heard the term "punch list" & I broke out in laughter & inquired, what is that? to which the reply swiftly came, "its a to-do list", to which I retorted, "so why not just say that?"
7th Oct 09 06:10

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Andy

What's also fun about this mangling of the English language is how when a higher-up throws a new (and probably excruciating) phrase into a conversation -it will then be parrotted by his minions as they do his/her nefarious bidding.
30th Jun 09 12:06

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Biggles

Shall we take this offline? (Just joking!)

The word 'engage' drives me up the wall. Everyone 'engages' with other people and organisations these days. Whatever happened to discussing and persuading?
30th May 09 06:05

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Sam van den Berg

In South Africa "in terms of" has become a universal replacement for a host of English words, especially short ones. There seems to be a universal feeling that two- or three-letter conjunctives, prepositions etc are somehow obscene or vulgar.

Also:

No politician will ever admit that there is a problem, it's an 'issue' or challenge
Nor will they ever commit themselves to actually solve a problem - they will only commit themselves to 'address the issue'

Well, at the end of the day, bottom line, that's th name of the game.


"You must investigate this problem in order to find a solution" become "You must adress this issue/challenge in terms of finding a solution"
13th May 09 11:05

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Tony Norwell

How Many Syllables in “Absolutely”? August 2002

(To the tune of ‘How Much Is That Doggie in the Window?”



How many syllables in “absolutely”?
I do hope there aren’t more than one!
Or is it folk who use it resolutely –
Are saying it only for fun!


How many syllables in “absolutely”?
My little song’s only in jest!
But what I’d like to know so resolutely –
Is what’s wrong with the simple word “yes”?
30th Sep 08 04:09

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oldie

What bothers me is the police version of office speak. You know the sort of thing, when officers are on the telly they use all these phrases like "we engaged in pursuit of the vehicle" parrot fashion but unfortunately they can't string them together into a proper sentence & so come across as uneducated.
I find this worrying when they have so much power over us.
26th May 08 04:05

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Steve

I was with you all the way on this - right up until you said 'Go learn' What ????
22nd Mar 08 12:03

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TaffyQuad

Speak plain English is best at all times - all the fancy phrases come from business school, and often refer to references in well known books and papers. People usually do it because (1) they think it will impress colleagues or (2) they have poor vocab (3) they are unable to be precise about what they really want. I recall one guy saying to me "I want to reach out to you." to which I replied "you must have long arms living in Austrailia". In other words he wanted to communicate with me but wasn't sure how, when or where. Next time some idiot requests you to do something in Jargonese just say "I am disinclined to acquiesce to your request." ....means "No".
15th Dec 07 02:12

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knobhead

The thing to do is to have a competition with a colleague. Whilst in the same meeting, each has to make a note of any ridiculous sayings that are used. Afterwards compare notes and the one who has heard/noted down the most wins!

If you decide to award a prize then a little thinking outside the box may be required.

um...........what?
31st Oct 07 12:10

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Liz

Here in Australia, we like getting a heads up before going forward in order to sing from the same song sheet at the end of day.
25th Sep 07 02:09

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MK

My take on this - Corporate communication has to be 'effectively precise'. But does it have to be mundane & blunt? What's wrong with some play with words?
9th Sep 07 05:09

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harrassed by

my bosses use the idiotic phrase corporate culture.what they really mean is whatever retrograde union busting idea they manage to wring out of management fascist magazines
15th Aug 07 05:08

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Alan G

In my pinion, people who use such phrases have a poor vocabulary and think that by injecting such prile statements into a conversation they appear to be more inelligent than they are.
However, for me, their pseudo - inellectual, affected babble just proves how stupid they are; just by using such phrases.
Other words and phrases that annoy me are :(a) the over use of "absolutely", Whatever happened to just plain YES, or Exactly, definately.certainly, precisely?
(b) "At this moment in time" (police speak) why not: at present, presently, or at this moment
(c) "These ones" I can hear my English Teacher revolving in his grave at this, He would say that you cannot have those words together because One is singular and these is plural (or words to that effect)
(d) "Two times" why not Twice?

I will not bore you with the umpteen other examples of Americanised or just plan bad English that are used regularly by so called "educated people" especially TV announcers, commentators, and Management personell.
6th Apr 07 06:04

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MikeP

It will have been brought to your attention that a fundamental and far-reaching restructuring is currently at this point in time under way.

Basically this concerns each and every employee and it is important that we all understand the new game plan and are seen to be singing from the same hymn book, in order to reinforce our global vision as a quality driven organisation.

It is essential that we run this by each and every single one of you in order that nobody should feel that they are out of the loop at any point in time, and I myself, as managing director, in terms of my remit, will make a point of touching base with you individually within the foreseeable future. In terms of timescale, whilst it is not at this stage possible to quantify a precise time lapse, as a ball park figure, you can expect these meetings to be on the agenda within the upcoming month.

We have undertaken an in-depth gap analysis, in keeping with our strategy as a result-driven client focused global player, on our business model, from which we have highlighted number of items which have been benchmarked to carry us on a fast track to a win-win situation. In terms of our best practice, we need to revisit our vision of employee empowerment to ensure a strategic fit which will, whilst we grow our business, ensure total commitment to value added service levels and a leverage towards an unprecedented bottom line in which you as shareholders will all participate.

A paradigm shift is envisaged whereby our mindset becomes focussed upon our knowledge base and the enhancement that this will bring to our global vision through best use of available bandwidth.

By thinking proactively outside the box we can develop synergies which will allow us to mature to global leadership in our industry. Reflected in our mission statement, our enactment of this vision of the future will be the dynamo that at the end of the day drives us forward into the 21st. century.
3rd Apr 07 10:04

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Dylan

I agree with Robbi all this hype is unnecessary - it makes them appear clever but basically they are insecure. I have the opposite problem when dealing with housing departments, associations etc. I often wonder about the education they receive as they have no idea whatsoever how to compose a letter, often forget to send the enclosures they refer to and condescendingly state please call me if you have a problem. They appear to have letter guidelines and anything outside the standard letter leaves them completely flummoxed. The only help I would like to give these people is my basic standard education on how to compose a letter effectively in plain English. I wonder what criteria one needs to become a "housing officer" - not a lot judging from the letters I receive, this is just a fancy title given to a trainee with no experience of dealing with the public, writing letters and no commonsense!! Westminster Council take note!
3rd Apr 07 09:04

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Kanny Kevin

I have never understood the saying *Walk the talk"....sounds like a bit of nonesence to me !
30th Mar 07 08:03

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ManagementIsMe

This site offer typical comments of a opinionated person with little management experience, little in the way to offer an employer in education and spend to much thinking about negatives then positives or maybe you just have too much time on your hands. It's very simple, if management talk riddles simply correct them by repeating back to them in plain english what they mean't. It's as simple as that! If you had real experience in management you would understand that management are not always right, they're simply their to guide a body of people, work the team towards a common goal. Some people like you, simple don't get it... your all working for a common goal why fight it not everyone is perfect and just because your a leader doesn't change that. Goodluck hope you find what your looking for.
14th Jan 07 02:01

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Bobby Shafto

Whilst many of these phrases are indeed cringeworthy, to say the least, they generally provide a pretty clear analogy. The problem as I see it is they are created by smart consultants and managers who may use them cleverly and sparingly but then are subsequently adopted by not so smart consulants and the rest of the management world who flog them to death. I have come across a couple of crackers this week. "We've all got war stories but lets stay focussed on the future." and "It's not like we're trying to boil the ocean here."!!However, were they not used you would spend far longer in meetings and "workshops" whilst your manager waffles away trying to explain at length what he or she means (if they even know). Interesting to see the two sides of the debate though. On one side those who clearly use this type of language, defending their position. On the other side the good honest, hard working, salt of the earth who is probably currently in the smoking gazebo telling another bunch of bitter minions who will never amount to anything how he would run things differently. Anyway, things could be a lot worse, you think management jargon is bad, check the response below from David the Yank (no no - it is actually "y"ank). If you were really unfortunate you could sit next to him at work, if he had a job. Sorry David but you are asking for it with your sad attempt to impress us with you psuedo intelligent rhetoric. And sort your grammar out pal before you start using fancy words. The plural of "boss" is "bosses", not "boss's", ya numpty.
7th Nov 06 06:11

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GAZ

What about....."Heads up my base in a blue envelope on the same table, chap"
I live with this garbage everyday......
6th Nov 06 10:11

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Kipper

Ref/JT 12/11/05 is not 'doing a number on it'
just what the complaints are all about/
6th Nov 06 09:11

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Ivan

What is really worrying is that these people were appointed after a rigorous interview where, presumably, they used this language to impress senior management. What does that say about them?
6th Nov 06 07:11

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THE ARGUIST

So called Line Managers are usually talentless parasites who can't believe their luck that they can claim or pretend to have "leadership" and communication skills and be paid more for them than the people who actually know all about the job and can actually do it. When they've finished another easy day's spouting about their " communication" or "people" skills, they are always bemused when they go in the pub in the evening and see everyone skiddadling up the other end of the bar muttering something on the lines of "Look Out, here comes the nerd " !!!
29th May 06 12:05

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KoRn

You do not need to be an einstein to understand all of these phrases.. Well if you don't, maybe you just bought your university bachelor diploma or you have only one from high school.. Anyway, you probably have a great lack of brains, or you use the one from your back instead, so you can understand only language which your children can speak..
16th May 06 04:05

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S

If they make another series of the "The Office", I think they could get some good material from this.
16th May 06 10:05

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gasgas

Next time one of your bosses uses language like this , please remind him that if he uses it again you will slit his / her throat !!
8th May 06 11:05

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David the Yank

Well, I know, for one, the phrase, "in the loop" comes from Chicago, where "the loop" is the name for downtown. So to be "in the loop" originally meant to be where all the action was and, then, eventually got co-opted to mean "to be informed of what the action is." So, yeah, that one is definetely American in origin. But I personally love idioms and jargon. I think it makes the language much more colorful and if you remember, Shakespeare was the one who introduced slang as an acceptable language to the aristocracy who were at the time creating prescriptive rules such as "don't end sentences with prepositions" and "don't split infinitives" and "don't use contractions in literature." Well, the first two are just based on latin translations of english where it is impossible to split infinitives or to end a sentence with a prepositions because they are inseperable morphemes like the "s" at the end of our plural words. So to say things like "don't split infinitives" in english is tantamount to saying that we should capitalize all of our nouns like in German (which has a much better claim to our grammatical origins). So, I guess if you guys want to complain about the language that your boss's use, I think you should probably look a bit deeper because it is probably not their language that you are upset about, but your subservient role to them.
5th May 06 06:05

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Steviebhoy

All these management phrases suck and is patter that losers use to diguise their amatuerism.

We have a wee hard-nut gaffer that uses them all the time and he is mocked by everyone for it - he only does it to impress the Directors and abides by none of it himself.
19th Apr 06 09:04

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Jinty Graham

Ask me any management phrase you don't understand and I will explain it.
19th Apr 06 09:04

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Bryster

I can't believe I've found this site...brilliant! The timing is uncanny too. Only this week my manager has e-mailed me regarding a customer complaint. This prompted phrases like "we have to put meat on the bones with this one...." (still trying to figure this one out) and "The bombs are dropping on this one..." but the most cringeworthy was "we have to hit the ground running...." Plleeaasse!
9th Mar 06 07:03

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Dave

Best one I ever heard was on the tube. American 1: "Why did you take the job?"
American 2: "At the time I was in a negative alternative employment situation."
I think he meant that he had no choice!
15th Feb 06 02:02

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TED BUNDY

Well , they are living another world to the other employees aint they ? - as soon as anyone gets into managment who dont deserve to be there - they get all above themselves and talk waffle - I was team leader myself for a bit - and obviously I thought I was gonna be the next Watt Tyler and stick up for the rights of call centre workers etc - Fat chance ! - once you have to rub sholders with the powers that be at work you find they dont give a fig about the people on the factory floor and the meeting suject matter goes along the lines of " Wasnt our new advert on Tv really cool ! " - I say " so when are you gonna get the stock in that the advert is showing ? its been 6 months now ?" - dirty looks from all ! - get rid of that team leader - she's too in touch with the needs of the workers !!
7th Feb 06 04:02

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Bushbaby

Anyone else noticed politicians repeating the phrase "Going Forward" endlessly? As if they had an influence Going Backwards, but preferred instead to try and have some influence on the future...
2nd Feb 06 09:02

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Outreach business interface co

There's nothing wrong with US slang or accents, there is something wrong with this guff though, wherever it it comes from. I think some of these phrases were minted by British Management Consultants ( but not those referencing ballparks ;-)) The problem is people reel of these cliches without thinking... and they are so unspecific, the opposite of what is needed in business.
1st Feb 06 05:02

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Female

Sorry that I am rather late but I have only
just found this page by browsing. I really don't know why Americans are being accused of MURDERING the English language when our own kids, these days, are doing a very good job all on their own. I am not quite sure why the Yanks are getting a hammering here, when they are far easier to understand than a "thick" Scottish accent - or do they class their language as Scottish rather than English - probably. Leave the Yanks alone they are far more friendly and have lovely accents.
29th Jan 06 01:01

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happy jack

What a load of codswallop - the reason your line manager is your line manager is because she doesn't spend all her time worrying about rubbish like this! Your problem is that you can't think big, you're far too petty.
27th Dec 05 11:12

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Revan

Bunch of t w a t s ,....the people who use this kind of "language" and mean it.
20th Dec 05 11:12

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JT

Hey Nikki, I'm a yank who lived in Suffolk for a few years and loved it. My ancestry is British and I definitely feel proud of it. Let me just say...while we're pretty good at doing a number on it, it isn't only the yanks killing the English language. I've heard some rather grotesque displays of it in it's mother land. Plus being in middle management myself, I think you're right that most of those originated here. Something I'm not proud of and refuse to use in my own use of the language. Love you too, British cousin (not kidding either).
11th Dec 05 12:12

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newenglander

As an american I agree that these phrases are probably from this side of the pond,How would like to listen to this weaselese every day?
7th Dec 05 02:12

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britishboy

It is a way for boring talentless people attempting to sound erudite. It is also the culture of exclusion..personally I am happy to be excluded from it but still...they try to turn management into a science or black art like alchemy in order to keep others out and retain the "mysteries" of the photocopy machine or the MIS report lol. The only mystery of the office is how to get a good cup of tea from those damned machines! BB
3rd Dec 05 09:12

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Nikki

It's a further example on how our beautiful language is MURDERED by the Yanks (as much as I love our cousins across the big pond [another yank-ism!] I hate the way they butcher our language).

I think I am right in saying that most if not all of these hideous sayings are American in origin?
2nd Dec 05 07:12

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TheJ

FANTASTIC!!! I just "failed" on a job interview, and I think it's because I refuse to use the aforementioned phrases. I'm not sad at all.
2nd Dec 05 09:12

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