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Horse manure on the road is dangerous

As a biker I do not understand why horses are allowed on the road.  Horse riders are for ever complaining about vehicles not giving them room, yet they allow their animals to foul the road. 

All you can do is hope and pray...

Don't they realise that when other vehicles, which pay road tax to drive on the public highway, hit this crap it creates a major danger.  I ride to work 20 miles a day through country villages (the most direct route for me). One of these villages is the home of one of the country's major polo clubs, along the main road through the village there are many blind bends.  You are riding along at a safe speed when you lean into a bend and there it is in the middle of the road, worse than ice, where do you go?  All you can do is hope and pray.

Why is it in this day and age where people are fined £500 for letting their dogs foul the verges, is it that horses are allowed on the road?  Why don't they ride around with a shovel on the back of their saddle so that they can remove their own crap.

horse crap in the road On top of this, especially near these polo grounds or hunting sites you have the typical upper class country folk who ride along and look at you as if you were the person who should not be on the road.  Not so long back one of these stuck up b*****s decided that a friends car, which had slowed down to overtake her horse passed to close and smacked it with her whip causing extensive damage.  Funny she hadn't any insurance and was not taking the blame and the Police don't accept it as criminal damage.

In conclusion, why is it that a horse which is not completely under the control of its rider, has a brain of its own, which does not have to pay any insurance or tax to go on the public highway, is allowed to leave its excrement on the road?

By: Duggy

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Talking about Horse S**t is as bad as the Welsh Language thread.

Hmm........on second thoughts, let's talk about Horse S**t it's more interesting.

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Stalag14 - 4-Aug-14 19:23

People buy motorcycles to ride fast - that is what they are for. Tight, bending country lanes are meat and drink to riders - they like the challenge I suppose.
In my opinion a man should not buy a motorbike if he is married and has children. It is not fair on the dependents to pursue such a dangerous pastime.

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marmalade - 4-Aug-14 18:20

Yes the post below is mine, when I type "gr" into the box below it comes up with all of my name, but for some reason that once it ignored the rest of it.

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grumpyoldwoman - 4-Aug-14 15:25

Well, where I come from if you go around a bend and come across something you couldn't see before it's called a "blind bend". Maybe the term means something different to you.

Why can't you just stop if you go around a bend on your bike and are confronted by an obstacle in the road? Why do you have to swerve if you are going slowly enough?

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gr - 4-Aug-14 14:44

I'm not going to argue with you GOW but I think you're just putting your own interpretation on it to justify your argument.

Regardless of that it doesn't mean you're travelling too fast. I sometimes round bends and corners to be confronted by various obstacles in the road such as parked cars, vans, skips etc. and need to swerve to avoid them. That's when I'm cycling so I don't think you can generalise and say that you must be travelling too fast for an obstacle to become a problem. I know that because at my age I cannot cycle fast. :-(

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Samson (Delilah's too busy to post) - 4-Aug-14 14:32

"so when going round a bend, you quickly approach an obstacle the size of a large car"

"If he wasn't referring to a blind bend the obstacle would be visible before you go around the bend!"

I think this explains sufficiently.

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grumpyoldwoman - 4-Aug-14 14:01

"it was Kyle who first mentioned blind bends without using the word blind"

Really? Have another read of that argument and then tell me which part of it isn't ridiculous! He clearly didn't mention Blind bends if he didn't say 'blind' did he!

Collar, does the expression "WUM" mean much to you? I think it should.

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Samson (Delilah's too busy to post) - 4-Aug-14 13:15

Samson, I think it's a bit more than a minority that are posh. I once drove past a posh lady on a horse with the wireless on (quietly) and she waved her big whip at me and bid me ''Clear orf!''
Even if they do not own their own horses they mix with the hoity toity lot, and gain some of their mannerisms.
There is nothing wrong with living in a council house, we know a family who used to live in one, and they are nice and polite etc..

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collar - 4-Aug-14 12:45

Samson, it was Kyle who first mentioned blind bends without using the word blind; "so when going round a bend, you quickly approach an obstacle the size of a large car going slower than a cyclist, most peoples initial reaction would be to avoid this obstacle and swerve on to the wrong side of the road and for some it could be their last."

If he wasn't referring to a blind bend the obstacle would be visible before you go around the bend! There are a lot in the lanes where I do much of my driving, and going around them slowly is essential as you never know what you might find.

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grumpyoldwoman - 4-Aug-14 12:43

GOW.........I think you're overstating a point there to be honest.
Blind bends, tight bends etc. etc. The roads of the UK are not exactly riddled with them are they! I'm also pretty confident that horses don't wait until they have rounded either a tight or blind bend to deficate. I don't think they're really capable of that level of thought. Sometimes they do it on a straight bit of road!
It's good to have differring views about things but let's at least keep things in the rel world.

Collar, not everyone that rides a horse is posh with a bad attitude. They're probably a minority of horse riders. You have to remember that most horse riders don't actually own the horse. My sister owns a horse and lives in a council house and has a normal job. She is anything but posh.

There has never been a sweeping generalisation that has added anything constructive to a debate. Extremes of life are a rarity not an everyday occurrance

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Samson (Delilah's too busy to post) - 4-Aug-14 12:20

Oh Kyle, I never mentioned tight bends. I did mention blind bends, which many bends are. Anyone on the road should go around a blind bend slowly enough to stop if there is an obstacle in the road. It may be another car or bike broken down, after all. There may be people trying to push a just broken down vehicle away from the bend.

If you encounter horses or horse poo around a blind bend or on straight road and have to swerve to avoid them you are going too fast. You should be able to stop and go around the obstacle when it's safe.

If riders did as you asked and tied up the horse, dismounted and scraped the poo off the road, what happens if someone else comes around the bend too fast? They would still have to swerve to avoid them or plough into horse and/or rider. Outcome much the same.

The only time I have ever been a horse rider was when I took a few lessons on a pony at the age of 15, a long time ago! I live in the country and meet horses in the lanes quite often. I always keep out of their way as I don't want a hoof kick in the side of my car.

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grumpyoldwoman - 4-Aug-14 11:33

I would say todays' roads are not the safest of places for a horse and rider. I would not be happy if my daughter suddenly decided she wanted a horse, and planned to take it on the road - however, she goes to a state school so this is unlikely

The attitudes of these 'horse riders' are half the problem. It's only the fact that they are 'posh', and dislike the poor road users, they think they don't need training, covered by all the taxes 'Daddy' pays, insufficiently trained horse oriented, non-poo-picking up owners who are, obviously posh, the problem being everyone else.

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collar - 4-Aug-14 11:31

I can't agree that they shouldn't be on the road. Everyone has the right to use the road regardless of the requirement for licences, tax, insurance etc.
I do agree though that there should be a mandatory safety test for all road users.

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Samson (Delilah's too busy to post) - 4-Aug-14 11:00

Hmm.. Horses for courses they say!
He didn't say he owned a motorcycle - he said it was quicker than one. Would be interested in what vehicle you do drive though.

Completely agree with the 'obstacle in the road' aspect, many of these 'horse riders' shouldn't even be on the road - and probably wouldn't let you past in your car - the modern driving test I took many years ago, so I know what I'm talking about,there should be mandatory horse-tests for these 'horse riders'.

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collar - 4-Aug-14 09:22

How anyone can claim that any kind of obstacle in the road is not a potential hazard is beyond me.
I was overtaken by a car many years ago that went through some horse manure. It flicked it up of its rear wheel and sent it straight at my head. Fortunately I saw it coming and moved. I was a pedestrian at the time.

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Samson (Delilah's too busy to post) - 4-Aug-14 08:46

Damn woman cant read. I never mentioned going fast or mentioned "tight bends" or did i say its the only obstacle on the road.. Please read my posts carefully before trying to argue with them. Your clearly a horse rider with a bias opinion... just to clarify i said "when going round a bend". Its just you, when i mentioned a motorcyclist you automatically branded it as a fast vehicle. Typical horse rider... If your going to argue with me, please make sure its about something I've actually said....

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Kyle - 4-Aug-14 08:32

That is telling her G.O.W. You could have mentioned the sheep droppings all over the Horseshoe pass. Very slippy when fresh.

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boblet - 14-Jul-14 12:12

It is the responsibility of the driver/bike rider to drive at a suitable speed allowing for obstacles in the road, particularly around blind bends.

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grumpyoldwoman - 14-Jul-14 09:21

Oh dear Kyle. Do you really think that horses are the only obstacle you may find in the road if you go too fast around a blind bend?
Or horse manure the only thing that may be on the road surface to hamper motorcyclists?

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grumpyoldwoman - 14-Jul-14 09:11

A local auctioneer describes certain lots, as "box's of household items". He maintains that certain customers spends hours filling these box's with nothing.

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boblet - 13-Jul-14 14:11

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